Crops and Livestock

EVENTS

From Grain to Plate Field Day

Date: June 30, 2019, 10:30am-3pm
Location: Meadowlark Organic Farm, Ridgeway, WI
details

Container Farms: Unique Structures for Growing Vegetables

Date: July 7, 2019, 10-3
Location: Badger Rock Neighborhood Center, Madison
details

Growing Food in Urban Areas

Date: July 13, 2019, 8:30-4:30
Location: Troy Farm, Madison
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more events

SUCCESS STORIES

The Wisconsin School for Beginning Dairy and Livestock Farmers: Keeping the Dream of Farming Alive

As older farmers retire, fewer young farmers are stepping in to take their place. The number of beginning farmers dropped 20 percent in the last five-year census period, and the average US farmer now tops 58 years of age. more

CIAS Mini-Grants Support Graduate Student Research in Sustainable Agriculture

CIAS supports innovative graduate student research addressing the challenges faced by small- and medium-sized farms and food businesses. Awarded annually, our competitive mini-grants aid students as they initiate their research in sustainable agriculture and food systems. more


MARKET FARM MADNESS

Announcing the 2019 Market Farm Madness Champion!

Hoophouse is your 2019 Market Farm Madness champion! They withstood high winds, late snow storms and controversy over cost share payments to win the tournament. more

more madness

Comparing Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Dairy Systems (CIAS Research Brief #101)

When researchers at UW-Madison compared greenhouse gas emissions of several different dairy farming systems in Wisconsin, they found that emissions were broadly similar between grazing and confinement dairies. more

Analysis of Water Quality Impact of Windrow Composting

Composting is an ancient and cost-effective way to speed the decomposition of manure by piling it in rows and turning it regularly to aerate. For the last two years, three members of Yahara Pride Farms have been working with UW-Madison to determine whether composting can lead to reductions in phosphorus (P) runoff loads from their farms. more

Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2017 Status Report

Wisconsin is a national leader in organic agriculture. Wisconsin had 1,334 organic farms in 2015, nearly doubling over the last 10 years. This puts our state in a good position to participate in the growing market for organic food, both in the U.S. and across the globe. more

Potential carbon sequestration and forage gains with management-intensive rotational grazing (Research Brief #95)

Do pastures under management-intensive rotational grazing (MIRG) differ from grasslands under other management in terms of forage quality and quantity, carbon sequestration and biological soil activity? Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison set out to answer these questions and discover some of the reasons behind differences in pasture productivity. more

Whole-Farm Modeled Phosphorus Loss Low on Grazing Dairy Farms (Research Brief #94)

Because agriculture is a major nonpoint phosphorus pollution source, there is strong interest in identifying and managing farm sources of phosphorus runoff. On dairy farms, possible sources of this runoff include cropland, grazed pastures, and outside cattle holding areas such as barnyards and overwintering lots. A new study based on modeled data for four dairy farms that use managed grazing found that these farms have very low phosphorus losses on a whole farm basis. more

Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2014 UW-Madison Research Report

This report summarizes 23 studies conducted by researchers in the UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) in partnership with farmers across the state. Those studies look at production practices for the state’s main agricultural products as well as farm management and marketing. more

Above- and below-ground grass growth responds to grazing management (Research Brief 91)

How is grass productivity above and below ground affected by grazing at different heights or by leaving different residuals after grazing? A study at UW-Madison found no simple answer to this question. Productivity of pasture grasses varies across grazing management strategies and species. more

Growing the Pasture-Grazed Dairy Sector in Wisconsin

The vast majority of dairy cattle in the United States never see the outdoors while they’re lactating. Over 50% of the milk produced in the US comes from just 1750 large farms, primarily in California, Idaho, New Mexico, and Texas. In contrast, about 22% or more than 3000 of Wisconsin’s dairy farmers use managed grazing. Can the unique features of milk from pastured cows contribute to the resurgence of an artisan dairy tradition? more
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